Watch “Anonymous – Operation Ice ISIS #OpIceISIS” on YouTube

Anonymous – Operation Ice ISIS #OpIceISIS: http://youtu.be/vtA335Nosww

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The War on ISIS: Views from Syrian Activists and Intellectuals

Reblog from Until Victory

Until Victory

by Danny Postel, Dissent Magazine

Free Syrian Army fighters, Aleppo, July 2013 (Dona_Bozzi / Shutterstock) Free Syrian Army fighters, Aleppo, July 2013 (Dona_Bozzi / Shutterstock)

Conspicuously absent from the debate about ISIS and U.S. intervention—both in the mainstream and in the leftosphere—are Syrian voices. ISIS and U.S. officialdom occupy center stage, leaving the perspectives of Syrian civil society activists and writers out of the equation. While hardly surprising, this omission is troubling.

In an attempt to remedy this imbalance, I asked several Syrians—longtime activists and intellectuals from a range of backgrounds, including Kurdish, Palestinian, and Assyrian Christian—what they think about the ISIS crisis and Western intervention. Here are their responses.

Three Monsters

I am ambivalent about a Western attack against ISIS.

On the one hand, I would like to see this thuggish gang wiped from the face of the earth. ISIS is a criminal organization that has killed thousands of Syrians and Iraqis while leaving intact another criminal organization—the Assad…

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Climate Activists Launch 30-Foot Inflatable Bomb Near West Point

Until Victory

by Ellen Davidson, The Indypendent

_ERD8495 Cropped Activists launched a 30-foot long inflatable bomb Tuesday morning to highlight the U.S. military’s role as the world’s largest institutional emitter of global warming gasses

Canoers from SeaChange 2014, activists from Veterans For Peace, and inflatable art creators Tools for Action launched a 30-foot inflatable bomb over the Hudson River in Garrison, NY, across from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. Lettering on the side of the blimp read “U.S. Military: Largest Consumer of Oil, Largest Emitter of CO2.” The blimp was created for the Sept. 21, 2014, People’s Climate March in New York City with the intention of drawing attention to the role of war and the military in contributing to climate change and other environmental problems. While the Pentagon refuses to release fuel usage data, it’s been estimated that the U.S. military is responsible for five percent of total global…

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