As Death Toll Surpasses 500, a Poem for Gaza

Until Victory

Yesterday, June 20th, saw the indiscriminate shelling of the Gaza City neighborhood of Shuja’iyeh, killing at least 63, including 17 children. Jewish Voice for Peace is estimating that the total death toll in Gaza since Israel began its bombing campaign on July 8 has risen to over 500. Read Electronic Intifada’s coverage of yesterday’s atrocities (including some graphic images) here. Mondoweiss also has an article here

Medics at al-Shifa hospital mourn their colleague who was targeted and killed in the eastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shujaiya neighbourhood earlier in the day on 20 July. (Anne Paq / ActiveStills) Medics at al-Shifa hospital mourn their colleague who was targeted and killed in the eastern Gaza City neighborhood of Shujaiya neighbourhood earlier in the day on 20 July. (Anne Paq / ActiveStills)

The following poem is by Nisha Bolsey, originally published on Mondoweiss:

Gaza, a Poem

“Most difficult moment for a father: split his children in all corners of the house or all in one corner and die together?” –Mohammed Omer.

I’m walking and a man says, “If the Palestinians would just love…

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Through Lens, 4 Boys Dead by Gaza Shore

#israelisawarcriminal

Until Victory

by Tyler Hicks, The New York Times

The aftermath of an airstrike on a beach in Gaza City on Wednesday. Four young Palestinian boys, all cousins, were killed. (Tyler Hicks/The New York Times) The aftermath of an airstrike on a beach in Gaza City on Wednesday. Four young Palestinian boys, all cousins, were killed. (Tyler Hicks/The New York Times)

GAZA CITY — My day here began at 6 a.m. Photographing something as unpredictable as war still has a routine.

It is important to be out the door at first light to document the destruction of the last night’s bombings. By midmorning, I check in at the hospital’s morgue to see if families have come to pick up the dead for burial.

When the routine is broken, it is because things can go horribly wrong in an instant. That is how it happened in Libya in 2011, when three colleagues and I were taken captive by government soldiers and our driver was killed.

On Wednesday, that sudden change of fortune came to four young Palestinian boys playing…

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